Garo 1965 Title/Author Listing + Notes

I was going to write about the copy-bon I bought at C77, but then I realized that no one is actually interested in that. On the other hand, a small handful of people are interested in Garo, so I felt that it’d be a better use of my time to write up another year of Garo information! If you missed my post on Garo’s 1964 issues (I don’t blame you, it was almost 8 months ago), it can be found here. Once again, names will be in the format of Lastname Firstname, and individual stories in each issue will be listed as Author, “Story”. Also once again, many thanks go out to Shiraishi-san for allowing me to draw from his Garo index, though his site currently appears to be offline. I am fairly sure that the works listed under each month are not listed in the order which they appear in the magazine, but the order they appear in the table of contents on the back side of the front cover.

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January 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Shinpen, Boujouki”
Suwa Sakae, “Unabara no Tsurugi” (possible alternative, “Unabara no Ken”)
Doya Ippei, “Juujutsu Kyouryuu Hiwa: Tamasudare”
Mura Shigeru, “Manga no Kakikata”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Nomura Shigeo, “Mizuki Shigeru no Manga”

Notes:
Okamoto Satsuko is the younger sister of Shirato Sanpei. She was also responsible for illustrations in “Douwa: mo Kichi” in the magazine’s first issue, a work written by Ri Haruko, Shirato’s wife.
“Nihon Ninpou-den” is a series of illustrated historical essays focused on portraying history from the common person’s perspective. Perhaps inspired by the ninja-heavy content of the magazine, the author states that the essays will be about “ninjas,” though he defines a “ninja” as an individual who works behind the scenes in order to move history, and goes on to say that it is possible for just one person to change history. This inaugural essay also discusses the Kennedy assassination, stating that the Warren Commission is a “big lie,” and implies that American gas corporations were responsible for Kennedy’s death, as his goals of peace in Vietnam would cut into their profits. As the magazine is still primarily focused towards younger readers, the essay is written in language easy for an elementary-school student to understand.
The reader’s corner includes a letter from a middle school student complaining that he is made fun of for reading manga at such an old age.
The editor’s corner introduces “Nihon Ninpou-den” as a work that has a new way of looking at history, then encourages magazine readers to read the articles, even if they don’t like history.

February 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Aa, Mujou”
Kusunoki Shouhei, “Senmaru”
Doya Ippei, “Juujutsu Kyouryuu Hiwa: Tamasudare”
Mura Shigeru, “Manga no Kakikata”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Mizusawa Shuu, “Metsubou no Naka no Honshitsu”

Notes: First issue to break 150 pages.

March 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kamisama”
Kusunoki Shouhei, “Senmaru”
Doya Ippei, “Yawara Musashi”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Wakagusa Manpo”
Mura Shigeru, “Manga no Kakikata”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Doya Ippei, “Goshin Hijutsu Kouza”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”

Notes: “Meyasu-bako” is a serialized column beginning in this issue where various authors would contribute essays, normally political in nature. This issue warns children to not drink the powdered skim milk given to them at school due to the discovery of high levels of strontium-90 in powdered school milk.

April 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kengou to Tabamochi”
Mura Shigeru, “Isoppu-shiki Manga Kouza: ‘Dounattenno’, ‘Kore wa Tamaran’”
Doya Ippei, “Goshin Hijutsu Kouza”
Mura Shigeru, “Gekiga Shoushi”
Azuma Shinichirou “Rotarii”
Kusunoki Shouhei, “Senmaru”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Wakagusa Manpo”
Maekawa (Maegawa?) Umita (??), “Ninja Iku Tokoro”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”

Notes: “Meyasubako” is a continuation of last issue, blaming capitalism and the relentless pursuit of profit for the presence of strontium in school milk. The author encourages readers to not believe their teachers, as he states that they will be fired if they don’t try to make their students drink powdered milk. Wakagusa Manpo (I believe, my notes are unclear) picks up on this theme and encourages schoolchildren’s mothers to protest this situation.
A note in the margins of a page in this issue urged Tsuge Yoshiharu and Kuki Makoto to contact the magazine ASAP.
First issue to break 170 pages.

May 1965
Front Cover: Sanpei Shirato
Sanpei Shirato, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Koufuku no Amaki Kaori”
Takano Yukio, “Noppo to Chibi wa Hoshi o Mita”
Doya Ippei, “Yawara Musashi”
Maegawa Umita, “Ninja Ootori”, “Ninja Iku Tokoro”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Azuma Shinichirou “Rotarii”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Wakagusa Manpo”
Oomura Eiji, “Haiboku no Gunzou”

June 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kodomo no Kuni”
Kusunoki Shouhei, “Senmaru”
Kagemaru Jouya, “Mokugekisha”
Maegawa Umita, “Ootori Hitoriaruki, Dokutori no Fukumaden”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Azuma Shinichirou “Rotarii”

Notes: “Mokugekisha” identifies itself as a work by the Gekiga Shudan, a group of gekiga creators.
This issue’s “Rotarii” is an essay titled “Manga and Gum,” where the author argues that manga needs to be a product more like gum in that it is enjoyed by children and adults alike. The author then goes on to say that in order for this to happen, there first must be more manga for adults, like the works that appear in Garo.
This essay is followed by an open call for works to be published in the magazine. The first guideline given for submitted works is that they “must be interesting.” Shirato also makes an appeal here, calling on authors to submit their work so that new talent can be found and fostered. Shirato says that a submitted work’s content, not art, is most important, as art can be improved later.

July 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kodomo no Kuni: Kusatta Kuni”
Ogawa Akira, “Tatakai Aru Kagiri Ni”
Maegawa Umita, “Ootori Hitoriaruki, Dokutori no Fukumaden”
Maegawa Umita, “Ninja Yuku Tokoro”
Masai Shigei (?), “Kanzen / Perfect”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Mura Shigeru, “Rotarii”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Wakagusa Manpo”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”

Notes: This issue’s “Meyasu-bako” was on the theme of how the Japanese people could not ignore what was happening in the Vietnam War.

August 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kodomo no Kuni: Senso to Heiwa”
Tsuge Yoshiharu, “Uwasa no Bushi”
Masai Shigei, “Gokiburi Oyaji”
Ogawa Akira, “Tatakai Aru Kagiri Ni”
Sasaki Mamoru, Okamoto Satsuko, “Nihon Ninpou-den”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Azuma Shinichiro, “Rotarii”

Notes: Tsuge Yoshiharu’s debut issue. As was the case with many manga authors at the time, his address is listed in the margins.
Beginning with this issue Mizuki Shigeru’s spot in the magazine is moved from its normal placement, the comic immediately following “Kamui-den,” to the very back of the magazine. This becomes Mizuki’s regular space, meaning that the magazine is bookended by Shirato in the front and Mizuki in the back.

September 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Hakanai Yume”
Masai Shigei, “Hitchpoppo Gekijou: Koroshiya Kagyou”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Wakagusa Manpo”
Hoshikawa Teppu, “Kao no Magatta Otoko no Monogatari”
Tsurita Kuniko, “Hitobito no Maisou”
Tsurita Kuniko, “Kamigami no Hanashi”
Chin Shimei, “Ochoko de Nomanai Sake”
Watari Nijuushi (?), “Mahiru”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Azuma Shinichiro, “Rotarii”

Notes: Hoshikawa, Tsurita, Chin, and Watari’s works were submitted entries exhibited in a special “new authors collection” section.
Masai’s work is a self-parody of the magazine.

October 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Shinkoudan: Tougyuu”
Tsuge Yoshiharu, “Suikashu” (?)
Ogawa Akira, “Tatakai Aru Kagiri Ni”
Masai Shigei, “Hitchpoppo Gekijou: Bocchan Koroshiya”
Kidou Jouji, “Hashiru Satsui”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Azuma Shinichiro, “Rotarii”

Notes: Kidou Jouji is a pen name for Tanima Yumeji, shoujo horror manga-ka. He also wrote episodes of Ultra Q under this pen name. He also wrote erotic gekiga under the pen name Dei Zunin.

November 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Mammoth Flower”
Kaji Issei (?), “Maguso Monogatari”
Masai Shigei, “Ikitai”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Aozora-Taro no E-Nikki”
Takayuki, “Furupan / Kopan”
Kidou Jouji, “Nanjamonja Ninja”
Kurokawa Shin, “Meyasu-bako”

Notes:
Kaji Issei (possible misromanization) is a pen name used by Hiroshi Hirata, best known in America as the author of Satsuma Gishiden.
Published letters from readers are from markedly older readers beginning around this issue, such as a student studying economics and Marx at Kyoto University who writes in for this issue to voice his love of Sanpei Shirato.

December 1965
Front Cover: Shirato Sanpei
Shirato Sanpei, “Kamui-den”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Fuku no Kami”
Mizuki Shigeru, “Kobu, Shinkoudan: Sore Kara no Musashi”
Tsuge Yoshiharu, “Unmei”
Kaji Issei, “Ai, Shinshaku Bushido Monogatari”
Hoshikawa Teppu, “Tsuki to Sensou”
Fujisawa Mitsuo, “Aozora-Taro no E-Nikki”
Masai Shigei, “Kinkai wo Motte 50 Nengo ni Ikou!”
Mitsuhashi Makoto, “Aru Hi, Wakamono wa Tabi Datta”
Kurosaki Shin, “Meyasu-bako”
Azuma Shinichiro, “Rotarii”

Notes: “Rotarii” is placed towards the front of this issue and discusses the debates over history textbook approval and Japanese historical revisionism.
While a large number of works are still samurai and ninja-themed, manga about war, specifically the Vietnam war and the social movements surrounding the war, are becoming more prevalant around this time, especially from newer authors such as Hoshikawa.

8 Responses to “Garo 1965 Title/Author Listing + Notes”

  1. shobon says:

    I have also been searching for copies of Garo for a long time. Unfortunately, according to a world library’s search, the closest copy to me is at Cornell. Thanks for your effort.

  2. Curtis Hoffmann says:

    Hi kransom. Thanks for posting this entry on the Garo index. I’d seen your earlier entry for 1964, but I couldn’t locate this one on 1965 when I was searching for it a few days ago. I may have been looking just before this got posted. Are all of the above notes from Shiraishi-san as well, or are they yours? Fascinating, I didn’t realizing that Satsuko Okamoto was related to Sanpei Shirato.

  3. kransom says:

    Hey Curtis – The notes here are ones I either jotted down to myself while going through the issues or notes that I found online. Hopefully I’ll get around to doing another year soon, but these always end up taking longer than I expect them to.

  4. shobon says:
  5. kransom says:

    yeah, I posted it on twitter and Ryan picked it up from there. really hoping I’ll be in the area during that time!

  6. shobon says:

    I think I’ll be taking a train ride up there, probably worth it.

  7. Curtis Hoffmann says:

    kransom, if you get out there, try picking up any freebie pamphlets for the thing they have. Any additional info on the artists that we don’t already have would be appreciated.

    On the other hand, if this exhibit covers the same manga I am right now, maybe I should quit the issue summaries I’m doing and move on to something else.

  8. Curtis Hoffmann says:

    kransom – I’m getting a fair amount of info amassed for my Garo series on TSOJ. Willing to pool resources?

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